Sunday, 15 February 2015

Inverness Cape: part 3 - references

I have two main resources for construction techniques that I've been using. The first is a modern military Inverness cape that I borrowed. I am also using this great Inverness cape tutorial.

Below are some references with descriptions and accompanying images referring to Inverness capes. The first one, The Handbook of Practical Cutting, is the pattern that I used for my cape.

The Handbook of Practical Cutting by Louis Devere 1866 
One of the most convenient of all cloaks, and the one which is in most general use, is the Inverness Cape. It is a kind of cloak with large armhole, this armhole being covered by a cape, which is placed at the front part of the garment only. It's appearance is shown by fig. 6. This cape is most commodious and comfortable in wear, ether for travelling, or as a evening wrapper for evening parties, or theatres. It is so loose that it does not disarrange the costume worn underneath, and the large size of armhole, permits it to be put on and taken off with the greatest possible facility. The cape affords that protection to the chest, required in this climate by a gentleman who is wearing a full evening dress costume.

The Handbook of Practical Cutting by Louis Devere 1866



The West-End Gazette of Gentlemen's Fashion-January 1, 1867 
Our next design is an Inverness Cape. This garment, although it is not fashionable, is a permanent favorite as a kind of wrap or over garment for railway travelling. There is no garment which surpasses it for this and similar purposes, so that it will always be in use.

The West-End Gazette of Gentlemen's Fashion-January 1, 1867



The West-End Gazette of Gentlemen's Fashion-December, 1871
 
It is a garment which is very useful as a wrap and for travelling, as it can be worn over a dress suit, or over another great coat. It is also very useful for young gentlemen, as they do not soon grow out of it.

The West-End Gazette of Gentlemen's Fashion-January 1, 1867


1 comment:

  1. A cape is a lot more complicated than i thought possible!

    ReplyDelete